Cinémathèque Selects

  • Gallery Theatre, Basement
  • 11 Feb 2017
  • 4.30pm
  • Admission upon purchase of tickets.

Cinémathèque Selects is a monthly double-bill screening that profiles the boldest film-makers and most inventive productions from Singapore’s past to its present. Focusing on diverse aspects of film-making, from directing to producing, script writing to cinematography and art direction, the series uncovers lesser-known local productions and features significant films in Singapore’s cinematic landscape. Each film screening is accompanied by conversations with the film-maker. A second film chosen by the film-maker reveals his or her inspiration and influences from diverse corners of the film world.

Ticketing Information
Standard Ticket: $11
Concession: $9 (Please refer to ticketing website for details.)

BUY TICKETS


Billy Liar
Eating Air
Director & Writer: Jasmine Ng & Kelvin Tong
Editor: Jasmine Ng
Producer: Loraine Frugniet & Mabelyn Ow
Executive producers: Andrew Yap, Jonathan Yap & Awi Lee
Camera (color): Lucas Jodogne & Mary Van Kets
Music Director: Joe Ng
Art Director: Theseus Chan
Sound (Dolby Digital): Michael Lee
Sound Designer: Noh Ghani Manga and Animation: Chan Man-loon
Assistant Director: Patrick Ong
Cast: Benjamin Heng, Alvina Toh & Joseph Cheong

1999 / 100 min / ratings TBA

Eating Air came onto the scene just as Singapore’s nascent revival in filmmaking in the 1990s began to flourish. A year before the film’s release in 1999, the Singapore cinema scene was boosted by the appearance of Glen Goei’s Forever Fever, Tay Teck Lock’s Money No Enough and Philip Lim’s The Teenage Textbook Movie. Jasmine Ng and Kelvin Tong’s gangland kungfu romance fantasy is the daydreaming delinquent offspring of those earlier films. A vibrant cocktail of the old-school boy-meets-girl narrative, street gangster machismo and coming-of-age stories, the first-time feature is defined by realism and fantasy in equal measure.Producer: Loraine Frugniet & Mabelyn Ow Executive producers: Andrew Yap, Jonathan Yap & Awi Lee Camera (color): Lucas Jodogne & Mary Van Kets Music Director: Joe Ng Art Director: Theseus Chan Sound (Dolby Digital): Michael Lee Sound Designer: Noh Ghani Manga and Animation: Chan Man-loon Assistant Director: Patrick Ong Cast: Benjamin Heng, Alvina Toh & Joseph Cheong 1999 / 100 min / ratings TBA Eating Air came onto the scene just as Singapore’s nascent revival in filmmaking in the 1990s began to flourish. A year before the film’s release in 1999, the Singapore cinema scene was boosted by the appearance of Glen Goei’s Forever Fever, Tay Teck Lock’s Money No Enough and Philip Lim’s The Teenage Textbook Movie. Jasmine Ng and Kelvin Tong’s gangland kungfu romance fantasy is the daydreaming delinquent offspring of those earlier films. A vibrant cocktail of the old-school boy-meets-girl narrative, street gangster machismo and coming-of-age stories, the first-time feature is defined by realism and fantasy in equal measure.

Benjamin Heng gives a spirited performance as Ah Boy, the leader of a motorcycle gang, whose carefree delinquent ways are challenged when the gang is embroiled in drugs and loan shark hustling. Adding to a volatile mix of street level violence and petty thefts is the appearance of Ah Girl, played by newcomer Alvina Toh, who is Ah Boy’s love interest and who compels him to make some life-changing decisions. The main cast was memorably supported by future director Michelle Chong and Channel 8 TV personality Mark Lee.

Billy Liar
Billy Liar
Director: John Schlesinger
Producer: Joseph Janni
Screenplay: Keith Waterhouse & Willis Hall
Camera: Denys Coop
Editor: Roger Cherrill
Music: Richard Rodney Bennett
Art Director: Ray Simm

1963 / 93 min / ratings TBA

A gem among the “kitchen-sink” dramas that constitute the British New Wave movement, Billy Liar, a film selected by the directors of Eating Air, inspired the production of the canonical 1990s Singapore film.

In Billy Liar, Tom Courtenay gives a flawlessly nuanced performance as Billy Fisher, the underachieving undertaker’s assistant whose constant daydreams and truth-deficient stories earn him the nickname “Billy Liar”. Julie Christie, who plays his romantic interest, is the handbag-swinging charmer whose free spirit just might inspire Billy to finally move out of his parents’ house. Deftly veering from gritty realism to flamboyant fantasy, Billy Liar is a dazzling and hilarious classic. 

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Exhibition Programmes
Author: National Museum of Singapore
Last Modified: 24 Jan 2017